1. Family: Malvaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Cola Schott & Endl.
      1. Cola scheffleri K.Schum.

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Tanzania.

    [FTEA]

    Sterculiaceae, Martin Cheek & Laurence Dorr; Nesogordonia, Laurence Dorr, Lisa Barnett. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 2007

    Type
    Type: Tanzania, Lushoto District: Usambara Mts, Derema, Scheffler 150 (B†, holo.; BM, EA, iso., K photo.!)
    Habit
    Evergreen tree 25–30 m tall.
    Trunk
    Trunk 30–60 cm diameter with smooth grey or brown bark and longitudinal fissures, crown pyramidal or oblong.
    Branches
    Flora districts: Ultimate branchlets 5–7 mm, reddish brown, with brown stellate hairs when young; bud-scales caducous, subulate, ± 9 mm long, 1 mm wide, apical bud thickly golden brown felty-tomentose
    Leaves
    Leaf-blade entire, oblong 7.5–25 cm long, 4–13 cm wide or ± orbicular in outline and digitately 3(–5)-lobed, 12–32 cm long, 13–30(–40) cm wide, divided for 2/3, the lateral lobes shorter, apex acuminate, acumen up to 1.7 cm, base rounded (subcordate in juvenile leaves), papery, glabrous above and below; petiole red, terete, 4–9 cm long, 1.5 mm wide, with brown tomentum when young; stipules caducous
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescences 4–5 per stem, borne amongst the leaves, paniculate, 3.5–6 cm long, 2.5–10 cm wide, thickly covered in felty reddish brown hairs, lowest branch 0.7–1.6 cm from the base, 0.7–1 cm long, bearing 2–3 partial peduncle, each 1–2 mm long, bearing a single flower; bracts caducous, not seen; pedicels 1–2 mm long
    Flowers
    Flowers pinkish brown outside, red with whitish pimples inside, perianth campanulate to widely obconical, 12–20 mm long, 14–20 mm wide, divided for ± half its length into 5–6 strap-shaped, reflexed lobes, outside with brown-black, felty tomentum of 5–9-armed stellate hairs, densest at the base of the perianth, inner surface glabrous apart from the involute margins of the lobes Male flowers with androphore tapering slightly towards the apex, 5–7(–10) mm long, 1 mm wide, puberulous, with inconspicuous, mostly simple white hairs; anthers 8–10, uniseriate, forming a short cylinder 1.2–2 mm long, 3.5–4 mm wide, affixed to the head of the androphore by a glabrous disc; vestigial carpels ± 0.5 mm long, glabrous, largely concealed in a flask-like cavity in the head of the androphore Female flowers known only from the type, slightly larger than the male, carpels 5 mm long, tomentose
    Male
    Male flowers with androphore tapering slightly towards the apex, 5–7(–10) mm long, 1 mm wide, puberulous, with inconspicuous, mostly simple white hairs; anthers 8–10, uniseriate, forming a short cylinder 1.2–2 mm long, 3.5–4 mm wide, affixed to the head of the androphore by a glabrous disc; vestigial carpels ± 0.5 mm long, glabrous, largely concealed in a flask-like cavity in the head of the androphore
    Female
    Female flowers known only from the type, slightly larger than the male, carpels 5 mm long, tomentose
    Fruits
    Fruit with five bright red or brown patent follicles, each subglobose and laterally flattened, ± 6 × 5 × 3 cm, apex subrostrate, stipe 0.3–0.5 cm long, 1 cm wide, glabrous, 3–5-seeded, the seeds embedded in jelly-like pulp.
    Seeds
    Seeds oblong-ellipsoid, ± 2.5 cm long, 1.2 cm wide
    Ecology
    Evergreen forest; 650–1500 m
    Conservation
    This species, although known from 16 specimens, distributed among seven sites, several of which are at least nominally protected, seems relatively common. Luke (in litt.) reports this as a locally common pioneer of medium sized semi-deciduous forest gaps (16–100 sq. m). In the absence of information that its forest habitat at these sites is in danger, this species is here treated as “near threatened”. IUCN (Red List 2002, www.redlist.org) list this species as vulnerable (VU B1+2b), however, this is on the basis of “Occurring only in the Nguru Mts and in the south of the Udzungwa Mountains at Kihanzi”. This seems unjustified in view of its actual, much larger, range.
    Note
    Apart from the type, only one other flowering collection has been made. Most of the 16 specimens known are sterile. Identification then depends on the characteristically 3–5lobed leaf and the golden brown, densely felty-tomentose apical bud. Confusion with e.g. Sterculia appendiculata, also with lobed leaves, is possible. While two of the fertile specimens have only entire leaves, those of the other specimens are mostly or always ± lobed. It seems likely that juvenile trees and suckers of this species develop deeply lobed leaves, whilst smaller, entire leaves are present in flowering branches of mature trees (more difficult to collect), much as in Cola gigantea (q.v.). This heterophylly has caused confusion (Brenan, K. B. 1: 143 (1956)). Although known from two disjunct areas (eastern Usambaras and Kanga Mt, near Lushuto), no morphological differences have been detected between the two. However, flowers are unknown from the Kanga Mt area. Brenan (loc.cit.) ascribed Sterculia lindensis to Cola scheffleri with some doubt. However Dorr has shown that this is not a Cola, but a Sterculia. A 17th specimen was reported while this account was in press: Luke et al. 8187, Udzungwa Mountains NP (Luke pers. comm.), extending the range to T 7.
    Distribution
    Flora districts: T3 T6 T7 Range: Endemic to Tanzania
    [FTEA]
    Use
    Seed pulp edible ( Pocs 6136B).

    Distribution

    Native to:

    Tanzania

    Cola scheffleri K.Schum. appears in other Kew resources:

    Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
    Brenan, J.P.M. [8347], Tanzania 15993.000

    First published in Bot. Jahrb. Syst. 33: 314 (1903)

    Accepted by

    • Cheek, M. & Dorr, L. (2007). Flora of Tropical East Africa, Sterculiaceae: 1-134.
    • Govaerts, R. (1999). World Checklist of Seed Plants 3(1, 2a & 2b): 1-1532. MIM, Deurne.

    Literature

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    • K.B. 11: 163 (1956).
    • T.T.C.L.: 593 (1949)
    • E.J. 33: 314 (1903)

    Sources

    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    Flora of Tropical East Africa
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
    'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0