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This species is accepted, and its native range is NE. Tropical Africa to NE. Kenya, Mozambique, Madagascar.

[FTEA]

Polygonaceae, R. A. Graham. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1958

Habit
A slender, much branched, straggling and trailing herb.
Stem
Stems weak, pubescent mainly down one side, up to 1 m. long or more.
Ocrea
Ocreae up to 1 cm. long, light brown, membranous, pubescent, not closely appressed, truncate with a terminal fringe of setae which may exceed the length of the tube; the leaf inserted in the upper half.
Leaves
Leaves small, petiolate, commonly 2–3 × 1.5–1.8 cm., deltoid, deltoid-ovate, or deltoid-lanceolate, marginally entire or slightly uneven, but not deeply lobed, apically very acute, the apex sometimes aristate, basally truncate to cuneate (rarely sagittate), sometimes ± hastate, glabrous above, the margin and veins of the undersurface pubescent, the lamina often pustular below.
Petiole
Petioles pubescent, 1–1.5 cm. long.
Inflorescences
Inflorescence slender, leafless, up to 30 cm. or more long, the stalk less than 1 mm. thick.
Bracts
Bracts up to 25 mm. apart below, 3–4 mm. long, pubescent and fringed as the ocreae.
Pedicel
Pedicels filiform, pubescent; those of hermaphrodite flowers lengthening, exceeding the bracts by 4–6 mm., becoming patent and later reflexing; those of male flowers neither lengthening nor reflexing but withering, not exceeding the bracts by more than ± 3 mm.
Flowers
Flowers white or greenish outside, strongly heterostylous; long-styled flowers with broadly linear or ovate tepals, 1.5 mm. long; styles 2 mm., connate 0.75 mm. (short-styled flowers not seen) (male flowers with 5 narrow, oblong, obtuse, flat tepals; hermaphrodite flowers with 6 tepals, the inner 3 petaloid, the outer 3 keeled, fide Meisner).
Fruits
Fruit fusiform, 5–6.5 mm. long, 1 (–2) to each bract, pendulous, glabrous or pubescent (sometimes on the same plant), bearing 3 spreading prickles ± 1 mm. long at the centre or slightly below.
Figures
Fig. 5/3 and 4, p. 29.
Habitat
Hedgerows, cultivated and waste ground; altitude range uncertain, but descending to sea level
Distribution
K7

[FSOM]

M. Thulin et al. Flora of Somalia, Vol. 1-4 [updated 2008] https://plants.jstor.org/collection/FLOS

Habit
Trailing or ascending, annual or usually perennial herb, pubescent to densely tomentose
Stipules
Ochreae with 3–8 mm long setae at the margin
Leaves
Leaf-blade linear-lanceolate to narrowly triangular, entire to lobed, 1–3 x 0.3–1.8 cm, acute at the apex, cuneate to truncate or with a pair of short spreading lobes at the base, sparsely pubescent below to densely tomentose all over; petiole 3–15 mm long
Inflorescences
Inflorescences c. 8–30 cm long; fruiting pedicels exceeding the bracts by 4–6 mm, becoming recurved
Flowers
Flowers white, strongly heterostylous; perianth 3.5–4 mm long
Fruits
Fruits 1–2 to each bract, pendulous, 5–7.5 mm long, glabrous or pubescent, with 3 spreading prickles 1–3 mm long near the middle.
Distribution
C1, 2; S1–3; E Kenya, Mozambique, Madagascar
Ecology
Altitude up to c. 500 m.
Note
This species is very variable in Somalia, particularly as regards indumentum and leaf shape. Plants with broadly lobed leaves may resemble O. sinuatum, and plants with sagittate leaves (the normal shape in C2) have often been called O. sagittatum R. Graham (a species only known from northern Kenya). O. atriplicifolium differs from both O. sinuatum and O. sagittatum in its longer and recurved fruiting pedicels.

[FZ]

Flora Zambesiaca. Vol. 9, Part 3. Polygonaceae-Myriaceae. Pope GV, Polhill RM, Martins ES. 2006.

Type
Lectotype, chosen by Graham (1957), a cultivated plant from Calcutta Botanic Garden (probably from E Africa), Herb. Wallich 1719 (K, lectotype).
Flowers
Male flowers 5-lobed; lobes narrowly oblong, obtuse at the apex Flowers pedicellate, 1–3 in the axil of each bract, arranged in leafless spiciform terminal or axillary racemes up to 30 cm long or more; bracts up to 25 mm apart, 3–4 mm long, obliquely truncate, acute or acuminate with a fringe of setae at the apex; pedicels filiform, pubescent, those of hermaphrodite flowers lengthening to exceed the bracts by 4–6 mm, becoming patent and later reflexed; pedicels of male flowers not exceeding the bracts by more than c. 3 mm, withering, not lengthening or reflexed. Hermaphrodite flowers strongly heterostylous; perianths white or greenish outside, 5–6-lobed; lobes 1.5 mm long and broadly linear or ovate Flowers pedicellate, 1–3 in the axil of each bract, arranged in leafless spiciform terminal or axillary racemes up to 30 cm long or more; bracts up to 25 mm apart, 3–4 mm long, obliquely truncate, acute or acuminate with a fringe of setae at the apex; pedicels filiform, pubescent, those of hermaphrodite flowers lengthening to exceed the bracts by 4–6 mm, becoming patent and later reflexed; pedicels of male flowers not exceeding the bracts by more than c. 3 mm, withering, not lengthening or reflexed Male flowers 5-lobed; lobes narrowly oblong, obtuse at the apex. Hermaphrodite flowers strongly heterostylous; perianths white or greenish outside, 5–6-lobed; lobes 1.5 mm long and broadly linear or ovate.
Style
Styles of long-styled flowers 2 mm long and connate below for 0.75 mm; short-styled flowers not seen Styles of long-styled flowers 2 mm long and connate below for 0.75 mm; short-styled flowers not seen.
Fruits
Nut pendulous, 5–6.5(7) mm long, fusiform, trigonous, glabrous or pubescent, with 3 spreading prickles c. 1 mm long arising on the angles at or slightly below the middle. Nut pendulous, 5–6.5(7) mm long, fusiform, trigonous, glabrous or pubescent, with 3 spreading prickles c. 1 mm long arising on the angles at or slightly below the middle.
Ecology
Disturbed places, sandy soils.
Note
Forbes is not known to have collected plants from East Africa, but O. atriplicifolium is common around Mombasa and Malindi, and was collected there from the middle of the nineteenth century onwards, so this record from c. 1800, assumed to be from Mozambique according to a note by N.E. Brown on the herbarium sheet, may be incorrect.
Distribution
Also in Somalia, Madagascar and Kenya. Mozambique Without precise locality (“E coast of Africa”), Forbes s.n. (K).
Habit
A slender straggling or trailing annual or short-lived perennial herb. A slender straggling or trailing annual or short-lived perennial herb
Stem
Stems herbaceous, weak, reddish, up to 1 m long, much branched, longitudinally striate, glabrous to pubescent. Stems herbaceous, weak, reddish, up to 1 m long, much branched, longitudinally striate, glabrous to pubescent
Leaves
Leaves petiolate; lamina 2–3 × 1.5–1.8 cm, deltate to deltate-ovate or deltate-lanceolate, with the margins entire or slightly uneven but not deeply lobed, acute and sometimes ± aristate at the apex, truncate to cuneate at the base, rarely sagittate, glabrous on upper surface, pubescent on margins and veins of the undersurface, undersurface sometimes pustular; petiole 1–1.5 cm long, pubescent. Leaves petiolate; lamina 2–3 × 1.5–1.8 cm, deltate to deltate-ovate or deltate-lanceolate, with the margins entire or slightly uneven but not deeply lobed, acute and sometimes ± aristate at the apex, truncate to cuneate at the base, rarely sagittate, glabrous on upper surface, pubescent on margins and veins of the undersurface, undersurface sometimes pustular; petiole 1–1.5 cm long, pubescent
Ocrea
Ocrea light brown, membranous, up to 1 cm long, pubescent, truncate with a fringe of reddish-brown setae at the apex; setae may exceed ocrea tube in length. Ocrea light brown, membranous, up to 1 cm long, pubescent, truncate with a fringe of reddish-brown setae at the apex; setae may exceed ocrea tube in length
Male
Male flowers 5-lobed; lobes narrowly oblong, obtuse at the apex.
Hermaphrodite
Hermaphrodite flowers strongly heterostylous; perianths white or greenish outside, 5–6-lobed; lobes 1.5 mm long and broadly linear or ovate. Styles of long-styled flowers 2 mm long and connate below for 0.75 mm; short-styled flowers not seen.

Native to:

Chad, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique, Somalia, Sudan

Oxygonum atriplicifolium (Meisn.) Martelli appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
Mar 25, 1957 s.coll. [s.n.] K000830458

First published in Fl. Bogos.: 69 (1886)

Accepted by

  • Dobignard, A. & Chatelain, C. (2013). Index synonymique de la flore d'Afrique du nord 5: 1-451. Éditions des conservatoire et jardin botaniques, Genève.
  • Brundu, G. & Camarda, I. (2013). The Flora of Chad: a checklist and brief analysis PhytoKeys 23: 1-18.
  • Pope, G.V., Polhill, R.M. & Martins, E.S. (eds.) (2006). Flora Zambesiaca 9(3): 1-277. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Boulos, L. (1999). Flora of Egypt 1: 1-419. Al Hadara Publishing, Cairo.
  • Bosser, J. & al. (eds.) (1994). Flore des Mascareignes 136-148: 1. IRD Éditions, MSIRI, RBG-Kew, Paris.
  • Thulin, M. (ed.) (1993). Flora of Somalia 1: 1-493. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Graham, R.A. (1958). Flora of Tropical East Africa, Polygonaceae: 1-40.

Literature

Flora Zambesiaca

  • Thulin, Fl. Somalia 1: 178, fig. 95 (1993).
  • F.T.E.A., Polygonaceae: 37 (1958).
  • Kew Bull. 12: 162 (1957)
  • Fl. Madagascar, fam. 65, Polygonacées: 7 (1953).
  • F.T.A. 6, 1: 101 (1909).
  • Martelli, Fl. Bogos.: 69 (1886).

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Brundu, G. & Camarda, I. (2013). The Flora of Chad: a checklist and brief analysis PhytoKeys 23: 1-18.
  • Boulos, L. (1999). Flora of Egypt 1: 1-419. Al Hadara Publishing, Cairo.
  • Thulin, M. (ed.) (1993). Flora of Somalia 1: 1-493. The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Flora of Somalia

  • Flora Somalia, Vol 1, (1993) Author: by M. Thulin [updated by M. Thulin 2008]

Flora of Tropical East Africa

  • Baker & Wright, Flora of Tropical Africa, 6 (1): 101 (1909).
  • Martel., Fl. Bogos.: 69 (1886).

Flora Zambesiaca
Flora Zambesiaca
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Flora of Somalia
Flora of Somalia
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Flora of Tropical East Africa
Flora of Tropical East Africa
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
'The Herbarium Catalogue, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet http://www.kew.org/herbcat [accessed on Day Month Year]'. Please enter the date on which you consulted the system.
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Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0