1. Family: Malvaceae Juss.
    1. Genus: Cola Schott & Endl.
      1. Cola dorrii Cheek

        This species is accepted, and its native range is Swaziland to N. KwaZulu-Natal.

    [KBu]

    Cheek, M., Lawrence, P. & McCleland, W. Kew Bull (2018) 73: 25. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12225-018-9749-2

    Habit
    Dioecious, evergreen, small tree 3.5 – 8 (– 18) m tall, up to 20 cm diam. at 1.5 m from ground
    Bark
    Bark light-brown, flaking (Palmer & Pitman 1972)
    Branches
    Terminalia-branching
    Buds
    Bud-scales c. 10 – 12, lanceolate, 3 – 3.5 × 1 mm, grey, densely and minutely puberulent
    Indumentum
    Indumentum dimorphic, stellate, c. 90% of hairs white, persistent, 0.025 – 0.03 mm diam., 7 – 8-armed, arms appressed c. 10% of hairs pale brown, caducous, 0.75 – 1.25 mm diam., 6 – 9-armed arms erect, sinuate, indumentum covering current season’s growth (larger, pale brown hairs falling first) previous season’s stems glabrous, epidermis white, often with deep longitudinal ridges
    Leaves
    Leafy stems terete 1.5 – 2 (– 3) mm diam., with (2 –) 6 (– 8) alternate, spirally arranged leaves (at anthesis) inserted over the distal 1 – 2 cm of stem in a rosette, the distalmost leaves subsessile, with the smallest blades, the most proximal leaves with the longest blades and longest petioles Leaf-blades glossy, dark green, oblanceolate (the smallest elliptic) (1.2 –) 3.5 – 8.5 (– 10.4) × (0.7 –) 1.2 – 3.6 (– 4.3) cm, apex shortly acuminate, acumen as broad as long, c. 0.5 cm long, base cuneate, abruptly rounded or obtuse, secondary nerves (4 –) 5 – 9 (– 11) on each side of the midrib, arising at c. 60° from the midrib, arching gradually up towards the margin and apex, connecting with the secondary nerve above, forming a looping infra-marginal nerve 1.5 – 2 mm from the margin, domatia absent; tertiary and quaternary nerves inconspicuous Glabrescent, young leaves with dense, overlapping 7 – 9-armed stellate hairs 0.5 – 0.7 mm diam., the arms slender, sinuous
    Stipules
    Stipules highly caducous, sub filiform, 3 – 4 × 0.6 mm, twisted, subglabrous
    Petiole
    Petioles, terete, 2 – 20 mm long, 0.5 – 1 mm wide pulvinus 3 – 6 mm long, 1 mm wide, at apex of petiole, persistently densely pale brown hairy, indumentum as stem
    Bracts
    Distal bract pair caducous, naviculate, about 3× longer than broad, constricted midlength, c. 1.75 – 3 × 0.8 – 1.5 mm, outer surface of bracts densely and minutely dull brown puberulent Middle bract pair concave, bifurcate, 2 – 3× broader than long, c. 0.5 × 1.5 mm, persistent post-anthesis and becoming flat, exposing the glabrous glossy mid brown adaxial surface Proximal bract pair semi-circular, about 5× broader than long, c. 0.2 × 1 mm
    Inflorescences
    Inflorescences 1-flowered, bracts caducous or nil, in axils of the previous season’s leaves (borne immediately below the leaves, 1 – 4 per leafy stem Inflorescence buds globose, 1.75 – 2 mm diam., 1 (– 2) per axil at (usually) leafy nodes, flower single, enclosed in c. 6 variously-shaped bracts
    Pedicel
    Pedicels 1 – 1.5 mm long
    Flowers
    Male flowers 12 – 14 mm across, pedicels 10 – 15 × 0.1 mm, terete, c. 50% covered by 4 – 8-armed stellate hairs, arms 0.2 – 0.5 mm long, articulated 7 – 8 mm below the flower Flowers pale green, divided into lobes for ⅚ their radius Female flowers 13 – 14 mm diam. with pedicels 10 – 12 mm long at anthesis, indumentum as male
    Calyx
    Tepals 6 patent (to slightly campanulate) oblanceolate to lanceolate 5.5 × 2.2 mm apex acute, abruptly rounded, base 1 – 1.5 mm wide, inner surface glabrous in proximal two-thirds, distal third with 30 – 50% cover of 3 – 5-armed stellate hairs 0.2 – 0.35 mm diam. outer surface moderately densely stellate-hairy, hairs overlapping, dimorphic, smaller hairs 5 – 10-armed, 0.1 – 0.15 mm diam., larger hairs 6 – 8-armed, 0.25 – 0.35 mm diam. Androphore 2 × 0.5 mm, base densely stellate hairy, hairs c. 8-armed, 0.6 mm diam., otherwise glabrous Tepals 6, patent to ascending, lanceolate, 7.5 – 8 × 2.5 – 3 mm, apex acute to subacuminate, base 1.8 – 2.2 mm wide, inner surface glabrous, outer surface 60% covered in a mixture of dimorphic stellate hairs (Fig 1K): 1) 5 – 7-armed hairs 0.15 – 0.2 mm diam. 2) 6 – 9-armed hairs 0.4 – 0.7 mm diam.
    Stamens
    Stamens 5, alternating with carpels, each 1 mm long, indehiscent Staminal head c. 2 mm diam., 1 mm long, stamens c. 8
    Gynoecium
    Gynoecium: ovary 4 – 5-lobed, 1.75 × 3.2 mm, densely patent hairy, style c. 1 × 1 mm, densely patent hairy, hairs extending to the dorsal surfaces of the style-arms, hairs 0.2 mm long, patent Gynoecium vestigial, concealed within apex, styles 4
    Style
    Style arms (4 –) 5, spreading, 3.5 – 4 mm diam., each blade-like laterally flattened 1.5 × 0.6 – 0.7 × 0.2 – 0.3 mm, the apex recurved, the ventral edge lacerate
    Fruits
    Fruit pedicels accrescent 1.5 – 2.2 cm long, articulation 0.4 – 0.6 cm below the apex
    Perianth
    Perianth persistent
    Carpels
    Carpels (1 –) 4 (– 5), each globose 1 – 1.5 cm diam., apex rounded, base stipitate, stipe slender 2 – 3 mm long; orange, with a slight ventral groove, stigmas persistent, indumentum of scattered 5 – 9-armed stellate hairs, each 0.4 – 0.7 mm across.
    Note
    Differing from Cola greenwayi in that leaf-blades (1.2 –) 3.5 – 8.5 (– 10.4) cm long on a single stem, petioles 0.2 – 2 (– 3.7) cm long, (not 3 – 16 ( –18) cm long and 0.3 – 4 (– 5.6) cm long respectively), flowers single per node (not in fascicles); fruitlet apex rounded, positioned apically, base stipitate (not rostrate, lateral and obtuse to acute).
    Distribution
    South Africa: KwaZulu Natal (Map 1).
    Ecology
    Sand Forest and Northern Coastal Forest; 5 – 150 m asl.
    Conservation
    Cola dorrii has not been previously assessed for its conservation status, since it was formerly included within a broadly delimited C. greenwayii var. greenwayii. The latter taxon was treated as Least Concern by Foden & Potter (2005) accessed at http://redlist.sanbi.org/genus.php?genus=1854. and by Raimondo et al. (2009). This was because of the very large extent of occurrence of that taxon as previously delimited by authors such as Verdoorn (1981).

    Distribution

    Native to:

    KwaZulu-Natal, Swaziland

    Cola dorrii Cheek appears in other Kew resources:

    First published in Kew Bull. 73(2)-25: 3 (2018)

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    Sources

    Kew Backbone Distributions
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

    Kew Bulletin
    Kew Bulletin
    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

    Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
    The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2019. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
    © Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0