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This species is accepted, and its native range is Sudan to Tanzania, S. Arabian Peninsula.
Delonix elata

[FSOM]

M. Thulin et al. Flora of Somalia, Vol. 1-4 [updated 2008] https://plants.jstor.org/collection/FLOS

Morphology General Habit
Tree 2.5–15 m high, with rounded-spreading crown; bark rather smooth, buff or grey
Morphology Leaves
Leaves with small deciduous subulate stipules; pinnae 2–12 pairs; leaflets (8–)11–25 pairs, linear-oblong, 4–17 x 1.25–4 mm, appressed puberulous on both surfaces
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Racemes c. 5–20-flowered; bracts small, deciduous before flowers open
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Petals 1.6–3.8 cm long; upper one smaller than the others, pale yellow, remainder white and all turning apricot; blades rounded or shortly pointed and lacerate
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens Filaments
Filaments (3–)6–11 cm long, red
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Ovary
Ovary hairy
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Pods 13–25 x 2–3.7 cm
Morphology Reproductive morphology Seeds
Seeds oblong-elliptic, flattened, 12–15 x 5–8 mm, mottled.
Distribution
N1–3; C1, 2; S1–3 Egypt south to eastern Dem. Rep. Congo and Tanzania, east to Arabia and India
Ecology
Altitude up to c. 1000 m.
Vernacular
Lebi (Somali)

[FTEA]

Leguminosae, J. B. Gillett, R. M. Polhill & B. Verdcourt. Flora of Tropical East Africa. 1971

Morphology General Habit
Tree 2.5–15 m. high, with rounded-spreading crown; bark rather smooth, buff or grey.
Morphology Leaves
Leaves with 2–12 pairs of pinnae; leaflets (8–)11–25 pairs, linear-oblong, 4–17 mm. long, 1.25–4 mm. wide, usually rounded at apex, appressed-puberulous on both surfaces.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Inflorescences of 5–20-flowered (or more) racemes, puberulous to densely pubescent (including the calyces outside).
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Petals 1.6–3.8 cm. long, 1.8–4.2 cm. wide; the upper one smaller than the rest, pale yellow; the remainder white; later all turning apricot; all with their lamina ± rounded in outline or shortly pointed at apex and irregularly erose-lacerate and crisped on margins.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamen-filaments (3–)6–11 cm. long, red.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Ovary
Ovary silky to pubescent or tomentose all over outside.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Pods 13–25 cm. long, 2.1–3.7 cm. wide.
Figures
Fig. 3/1–5, p. 24.
Habitat
Deciduous thickets and bushland; 430–1400 m., perhaps higher
Distribution
K1 K2 K4 K6 K7 T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T7 U1 in the eastern Congo Republic, and northwards from the Flora area to Egyptalso in Arabia and extending to India

[ILDIS]

International Legume Database and Information Service

Conservation
Not Threatened
Ecology
Africa: Somalia-Masai bushland and thicket
Morphology General Habit
Perennial, Not climbing, Tree
Vernacular
Creamy Peacock Flower, Vatham-nairaini, Vatham-rasi, White Gul Mohur, Yellow Gul-Mohur

[FZ]

Leguminosae, R.K. Brummitt, A.C. Chikuni, J.M. Lock and R.M. Polhill. Flora Zambesiaca 3:2. 2007

Morphology General Habit
Tree 2.5–15 m high with rounded spreading crown and rather smooth, buff or grey bark.
Morphology Stem
Young stems thinly appressed-pubescent to densely spreading-pubescent, later glabrescent.
Morphology Leaves
Leaves: petiole and rachis together (4)8–20 cm long; pinnae 2–12 pairs; pinna rachis (0.5)1–9 cm long; leaflets (8)11–25 pairs, 4–17 × (1)1.5–4(4) mm, oblong, ± rounded at the apex, asymmetrical at the base, finely appressed-pubescent on both surfaces, sometimes glabrescent above; stipules subulate, up to 3 mm long, caducous.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Inflorescences
Racemes short, the axis up to 5 cm long and ± densely appressed- or spreading-pubescent, each with about 5–20 flowers; bracts up to 3.5 × 2.5 mm, but usually falling at a very early stage, ovate, densely pubescent; pedicels 1.5–3.5(5) cm long.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Hypanthium
Hypanthium including a narrow basal part 1–4 mm long abruptly expanded above into a conspicuous campanulate part 3–7(8) mm long, the whole on the outside finely pubescent with appressed grey hairs to densely brown-tomentose.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Calyx
Sepals 1.2–3.3(4) cm long, lanceolate to oblong, tapering above to an ± acute apex, similar to the hypanthium in pubescence.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Corolla
Petals 1.6–3.2(3.8) cm long, the upper one smaller than the others and yellow to orange, the others white but fading to yellow or orange, all ± lacerate and crisped at the upper margin.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Androecium Stamens
Stamen filaments 3–11(14) cm long, bright red, much exceeding the petals.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Flowers Gynoecium Ovary
Ovary shortly stipitate, densely pubescent, often ± sericeous.
Morphology Reproductive morphology Fruits
Pods 13–26 × 2.1–3.7 cm; seeds 8–19, c.15 × 8 × 3 mm, compressed.

[ILDIS]
Use
Chemical products, Environmental, Medicine, Miscellaneous, Wood

Native to:

Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zambia, Zaïre

Introduced into:

Andaman Is., Assam, India, Leeward Is., Maldives, Myanmar, Namibia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, West Himalaya

Delonix elata (L.) Gamble appears in other Kew resources:

Date Reference Identified As Barcode Type Status
Mar 17, 1954 Schweinfurth, G. [423], Eritrea K000232331
Ellis, P.E. [110], Ethiopia 15486.000
K000232328
Schweinfurth, G. [2260], Sudan K000232329
Schweinfurth, G. [2259], Sudan K000232330
s.coll. [Cat. no. 5812], India Poinciana elata K001122222
s.coll. [Cat. no. 5812] Poinciana elata K001122221

First published in Fl. Madras: 396 (1919)

Accepted by

  • Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. & Strong, M.T. (2012). Catalogue of seed plants of the West Indies Smithsonian Contributions to Botany 98: 1-1192.
  • Brummitt, R.K., Chikuni, A.C., Lock, J.M. & Polhill, R.M. (2007). 61. Leguminosae Subfamily Caesalpinioideae Flora Zambesiaca 3(2): 1-218. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Darbyshire, I., Kordofani, M., Farag, I., Candiga, R. & Pickering, H. (eds.) (2015). The Plants of Sudan and South Sudan: 1-400. Kew publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Dobignard, A. & Chatelain, C. (2012). Index synonymique de la flore d'Afrique du nord 4: 1-431. Éditions des conservatoire et jardin botaniques, Genève.
  • Ghazanfar, S.A. (2007). Flora of the Sultanate of Oman. volume 2. Crassulaceae - Apiaceae Scripta Botanica Belgica 36: 1-220.
  • Govaerts, R. (2000). World Checklist of Seed Plants Database in ACCESS D: 1-30141.
  • Hedberg, I. & Edwards, S. (eds.) (1989 publ. 1990). Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea 3: 1-659. The National Herbarium, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia & The Department of Systematic Botany, Upps.
  • Kalema, J. & Beentje, H. (2012). Conservation checklist of the trees of Uganda: 1-235. Kew Publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Kumar, S. & Sane, P.V. (2003). Legumes of South Asia. A Checklist: 1-536. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Lock, J.M. (1989). Legumes of Africa a check-list: 1-619. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Meena, S.L. (2012). A checklist of the vascular plants of Banaskantha district, Gujarat, India Nelumbo 54: 39-91.
  • Milgahid, A.M. (1989). Flora of Saudi Arabia, ed. 3, 2: 1-282. University Libraries, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
  • Mosti, S., Raffaelli, M. & Tardelli, M. (2012). Contributions to the flora of central-southern Dhofar (Sultanate of Oman) Webbia; Raccolta de Scritti Botanici 67: 65-91.
  • Wood, J.R.I. (1997). A handbook of the Yemen Flora: 1-434. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Literature

Kew Backbone Distributions

  • Acevedo-Rodríguez, P. & Strong, M.T. (2012). Catalogue of seed plants of the West Indies Smithsonian Contributions to Botany 98: 1-1192.
  • Brummitt, R.K., Chikuni, A.C., Lock, J.M. & Polhill, R.M. (2007). 61. Leguminosae Subfamily Caesalpinioideae Flora Zambesiaca 3(2): 1-218. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Darbyshire, I., Kordofani, M., Farag, I., Candiga, R. & Pickering, H. (eds.) (2015). The Plants of Sudan and South Sudan: 1-400. Kew publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Ghazanfar, S.A. (2007). Flora of the Sultanate of Oman. volume 2. Crassulaceae - Apiaceae Scripta Botanica Belgica 36: 1-220.
  • Kumar, S. & Sane, P.V. (2003). Legumes of South Asia. A Checklist: 1-536. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Lock, J.M. (1989). Legumes of Africa a check-list: 1-619. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.
  • Mosti, S., Raffaelli, M. & Tardelli, M. (2012). Contributions to the flora of central-southern Dhofar (Sultanate of Oman) Webbia; Raccolta de Scritti Botanici 67: 65-91.

Flora of Somalia

  • Flora Somalia, Vol 1, (1993) Author: by M. Thulin [updated by M. Thulin 2008]
  • Pickering, H. & Awale, A. I. (2018). Introduction to plants in Central Somaliland. Ponte Invisibile, Redsea Cultural Foundation.

Flora of Tropical East Africa

  • B. D. Burtt, Field Key Savannah Gen. & Sp. Tang. Terr.: 30 (1939).
  • Bak. f., Leguminosae of Tropical Africa: 624 (1930).
  • Dale & Greenway, Kenya Trees and Shrubs p. 103, t. 9 (1961).
  • F. White, Forest Flora of Northern Rhodesia p. 433 (1962).
  • Gamble, Fl. Madras 1(3): 396 (1919).
  • J.P.M. Brenan, Check-lists of the Forest Trees and Shrubs of the British Empire no. 5, part II, Tanganyika Territory p. 102 (1949).
  • Roti-Michelozzi in Webbia 13: 195 (1957).
  • W.J. Eggeling, Indigenous Trees of the Uganda Protectorate, ed. 2: 65 (1952).

International Legume Database and Information Service

  • Ali, S. I. (1973). Flora of Pakistan, No. 54 Caesalpiniaceae. Karachi:Univ Karac
  • Ambasta, S. P. (1986). The useful plants of India
  • Bhandari, M. M. (1978). Flora of the Indian desert. Jodhpur.
  • Brenan, J. P. M. (1967). Caesalp. In: Flora Trop. East Africa. Milne-Redhead & Polhill
  • Haines, H. H. (1922). The Botany of Bihar & Orissa, Part 3. London.
  • Rudd, V. E. (1991). Flora of Ceylon 7: 34-107. Caesalpinioideae
  • Senaratna, L. K. (2001). A check list of the flowering plants of Sri Lanka. Colombo.
  • Watt, J. M. & Breyer-Brandwijk, M (1962). Medicinal & Poisonous Plants of Southern & Eastern Africa
  • White, F. (1983). The Vegetation of Africa

Art and Illustrations in Digifolia
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew

Flora Zambesiaca
Flora Zambesiaca
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Flora of Somalia
Flora of Somalia
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Flora of Tropical East Africa
Flora of Tropical East Africa
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0

Herbarium Catalogue Specimens
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

International Legume Database and Information Service
International Legume Database and Information Service (ILDIS) V10.39 Nov 2011
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Backbone Distributions
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Names and Taxonomic Backbone
The International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families 2021. Published on the Internet at http://www.ipni.org and http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/
© Copyright 2017 International Plant Names Index and World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0

Kew Science Photographs
Digital Image © Board of Trustees, RBG Kew http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/